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Sat, 25th February 2017

Anirudh Sethi Report

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Archives of “American stock market indices” Tag

Global stocks hit fresh record high

Global equities are in virgin territory after Wall Street closed at another record amid a positive outlook for economic growth.

Political concerns leave the euro carrying the wooden spoon in the forex markets, while the broadly upbeat tone damps demand for sovereign bonds, pushing up yields.

Hot topic
The FTSE All-World equity index is at another record, up 0.2 per cent to 295,24, as investors are buoyed by signs of improvement in the global economy.

With US stocks making up about 50 per cent of the All-World, it is Wall Street that is the main driver of the global rally.

Overnight US Market :Dow closed -107 points.

U.S. stocks fell Tuesday as the market fallout of Trump’s travel ban on seven Muslim-majority countries continues to take a toll and investors digest weak fourth-quarter results from companies including UPS and Under Armour.

Industrial companies are down the most, but health care companies offset some of the losses. As they look for less risky investments, buyers are moving money into bonds and stocks that pay large dividends, like utilities.

The Standard & Poor’s 500 index  fell for a fourth straight day, its longest losing streak since before the presidential election in November. But the losses have been fairly small, and for the second day in a row, stocks recovered some of their losses late in the day.

The Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell 2.03 points, or 0.1%, to 2278.87. The Dow Jones industrial average dropped 107.04 points, or 0.5%, to 19,864.09.  The Nasdaq composite index was able to cut its losses and closed up 1.07 to 5614.79.

Bond prices rose as investors snapped up bonds. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.45% from 2.49%. That hurt financial stocks, as lower bond yields reduce interest rates and the profits those companies make from lending.

Investors who want income also bought stocks that pay outsize dividends, including real estate investment trusts and utility companies. Gains for those stocks limited the market’s losses overall.

In earnings news:

Overnight US Markets :Dow closed + 113 points.Nasdaq Hits New High

Stocks jumped Tuesday as the S&P 500 and Nasdaq hit new all-time highs and the Dow moved back up toward the 20,000 level.

The Dow Jones industrial averagegained 113 points, or 0.6%, to 19,912.71. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index climbed 0.7% to an all-time closing high of 2280.07. The tech-heavy Nasdaq composite index rose 0.9% to set a new closing record of 5600.96.

Materials and financial companies led the stock indexes higher in afternoon trading as investors sized up the latest round of company earnings news. Energy stocks also rose as crude oil prices headed higher. Health care, phone companies and other high-dividend stocks were among the biggest laggards as bond yields rose.

The heads of General Motors, Ford Motor and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles met with President Donald Trump early Tuesday. Trump wants the automakers to build new factories in the U.S. He’s warned of a “substantial border tax” on companies that move manufacturing out of the country and promised tax advantages to those that produce domestically. GM (GM) shares gained 1%, Ford (F) added 2.4% and  Fiat Chrysler (FCAU) jumped 5.9%.

Trump’s latest moves on trade and regulations have raised concerns over future access to the U.S. market, particularly among Asian countries. Trump signed a memorandum saying the U.S. will withdraw from the trade pact known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership. He also said he would renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement.

“The lack of any key U.S. economic data overnight had dealers focused exclusively on the Trump administration’s trade policy and the signing of the executive order to pull out of the TPP,” said Stephen Innes, senior trader at Oanda, of the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Benchmark U.S. crude  rose 43 cents, or 0.8%, to $53.18 a barrel in New York. Brent crude, used to price international oils, gained 21 cents, or 0.4 %, at $55.44 a barrel in London.

The 10-year Treasury yield jumped to 2.47% from 2.40% late Monday.

Overnight US Market :Dow closed -72 points

The Dow Jones industrial average erased its gain for the year on Thursday, part of a pullback for stock indexes as Treasury yields continued their upward march.

The Dow Jones industrial average fell 72 points, or 0.4%, to 19,732.40. That puts the Dow down about 32 points for the year and will makes this the fifth straight day of losses. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell 0.4% to 2,263.69. The Nasdaq composite fell 0.3% to 5,540.08.

Four stocks fell for every one that rose on the New York Stock Exchange.

Stocks have slowed in 2017 following an electrifying jump higher since Election Day. Investors are waiting to see what a Donald Trump presidency will really mean for stocks. They’ve already seen the optimistic case, as shown in the nearly 6% jump for the S&P 500 since Donald Trump’s surprise victory of the White House, propelled by expectations for lower taxes and less regulation on businesses.

But on the possible downside, increased tariffs or trade restrictions could mean drops in profits for big U.S. companies.

Bond yields continued their march higher, and the 10-year Treasury yield rose to 2.47% from 2.43% late Wednesday. Yields have generally been climbing since Election Day on expectations that President-elect Donald Trump’s policies will spur more inflation and economic growth. The 10-year yield is still below its perch above 2.60% that it reached in mid-December, but it’s well above the 2.09% yield it was at a year ago.

Reports have shown that the U.S. economy has been improving recently, and the latest on Thursday showed encouraging signs for the housing and labor markets. The fewest number of workers sought unemployment claims last week in 43 years, a sign that corporate layoffs are subsiding.

Overnight US MARKET :Dow closed -59 points.

Investor skittishness over coming policies under soon-to-be-president Donald Trump just days before his inauguration put stocks in the red Tuesday and pushed the Dow down for a third straight session.

Also haunting the market was another weak day for bank stocks, a sector that had performed strong at the start of the so-called “Trump rally” after Election Day but is running into profit taking. Shares of Morgan Stanley (MS) were down nearly 4% despite posting its best fourth-quarter since the financial crisis, while Goldman Sachs (GS) fell 3.3% and Citigroup (C) tumbled 2.1%.

The Dow Jones industrial average closed down 59 points, or 0.3%, to 19,827, or roughly 175 points shy of 20,000. At its low point, the Dow was down more than 110 points.

Markets were reacting to Trump comments in the Wall Street Journal suggesting that the U.S. dollar is “too strong” and could hurt U.S. multinationals. The president-elect also questioned an alternative tax reform plan being discussed by Republicans in the House of Representatives. A strong dollar hurts sales and earnings of U.S. companies that do a lot of business abroad.

Trump’s comments, not unlike some of his tweets that have caught investors by surprise on individual companies, created fresh uncertainty about what policies will actually be enacted once Trump takes office after Friday’s inauguration. Trump’s latest comments were viewed as new information by Wall Street.

The Standard & Poor’s 500 index closed down almost 7 points, or 0.3%, to 2267.89, while the Nasdaq composite fell 0.6% to 5538.73.

Bond prices rose. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.329%.

Overnight US Market :Dow closed -43 points.

Stocks ended mixed Thursday as retailers dominated the news with Macy’s and Kohl’s both plunging following weak holiday-season reports that led the chains to cut their profit forecasts.

Still, the Nasdaq composite’s modest gain of 11 points, or 0.2%, was enough to notch a new all-time high. Settling at at 5487.94, it topped the old record by half a point.

The Dow Jones industrial average finished down 43 points, a 0.2% decline to 19,899.29. Losing 0.1% was the S&P 500, which settled at 2269 even.

nvestors were also focusing on upcoming U.S. jobs data following the publication of the minutes to the Federal Reserve’s last board meeting.

Private U.S. companies added 153,000 jobs in December, according to payroll processor ADP. That total was a bit lower than analysts expected and slightly slower than the pace of hiring for the rest of 2016. The government will issue its own hiring report on Friday.

Overnight US Market :Dow closed + 60 points.Now 58 points away to kiss 20k

Stocks climbed Wednesday as Wall Street posted a second straight day of gains in the new year and the Dow once again approached the 20,000 milestone.

The Dow Jones industrial average ended up 60 points, or 0.3%, to 19,942.16. The blue-chip index rose has come close to topping 20,000 several times in recent weeks but each time it gets near has pulled back. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index rose 0.6% and the Nasdaq composite index gained 0.9%. Both the S&P 500 and Nasdaq are near their record closing highs.

Stocks maintained their gains following the release of the minutes from the latest Federal Reserve meeting that provided clues to why policymakers raised interest rates in December for only the second time since 2006 and forecast three rate hikes in 2017 instead of the two moves previously anticipated.

Fed officials said they might have to raise interest rates faster than anticipated to prevent rapidly falling unemployment and President-elect Donald Trump’s proposed fiscal stimulus from fueling excessive inflation, according to minutes of the Fed’s December 13-14 meeting.

Benchmark U.S. crude was up 1.8% to $53.24 a barrel in New York. It lost $1.39 on Tuesday.

Overnight US Market :Dow closed +119 points

What a difference a year makes. The U.S. stock market kicked off the first day of trading of 2017 with solid gains, a year after plunging in the opening session of 2016 on its way to its worst week to start a year ever.

The benchmark Standard & Poor’s 500 stock index — which closed up 0.9% to 2258 — posted a gain on the first trading day of a new year for the first time since 2013. Last year, the large-company stock index cratered 1.53% on January’s first trading session — its sixth-worst Day 1 percentage loss and worst annual kickoff since 2001 —   on its way to a worst-ever first week of the year decline of 5.96%, according to S&P Dow Jones Indices. The S&P 500, however, rebounded and finished 2016 up 9.5%.

The Dow Jones industrial average rose as much 176 points before pulling back and finishing up 119 points, or 0.6%, to 19,882. The blue-chip index came within 105 points of 20,000 after a late-year flirtation with the milestone fell short. The technology-packed Nasdaq rose 0.9% and the small-company Russell 2000 stock index, which gained 19.5% in 2016, finished up 0.5%.

Overnight US Market :Dow closed -57 points.Now 237 points short of 20k

Stocks sank on the last trading day of 2016, with the Dow now 237 points short of the 20,000 milestone that it came closest to hitting on Dec. 20.

It was merely a weak end to a very strong year, however, with the S&P 500 gaining 9.5% and the small-company Russell 2000 jumping 19.5% for 2016.

For the day, the Dow Jones industrial average lost 0.3%, off 57 points to 19,762.60. But for 2016, the blue chips gained 13.4%.

The S&P 500 ended 0.5% lower for the day, while the Nasdaq composite fell 0.9%

Global stocks mostly rose on the year’s last day of trading, with Britain’s index rallying to hit another all-time high. The FTSE 100, which was trading for only a half day, rose 0.3%. That leaves the index 14.4% higher over 2016. Elsewhere in Europe, Germany’s DAX rose 0.3%, while France’s CAC 40 gained 0.5%.

Overnight US Market :Dow closed -23 points.

U.S. stocks ended lower Thursday as health care companies took more losses and investors’ Dow 20,000 watch goes on.

The Dow Jones industrial average finished 0.1% lower, down 23 points to 19,918.88, and 81 short of the never-reached 20,000 level. The S&P 500 and Nasdaq composite lost 0.2 % and 0.4%, respectively.

Alibaba (BABA) fell 2.8% after the U.S. government put the Chinese e-commerce company back on a list of marketplaces that sell large amounts of counterfeit goods and is slow to respond when companies complain about knockoffs. Chinese regulators have made similar criticisms.

Benchmark U.S. crude gained about 0.9% to $52.95 a barrel in New York. Energy companies made modest gains.

Bond prices fell. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note climbed to 2.56% from 2.54%.

The dollar dipped to 117.43 yen from 117.54 yen. The euro rose to $1.0455 from $1.0427.

Stocks in Europe were also quiet. The DAX in Germany lost 0.2% and France’s CAC-40 fell less than 0.2%. In Britain, the FTSE 100 got a 0.1% lift. Japan’s Nikkei 225 index edged 0.1% lower and the Hang Seng in Hong Kong lost 0.8%. The South Korean Kospi fell 0.1%.