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Fri, 20th January 2017

Anirudh Sethi Report

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Archives of “charles dow” Tag

Overnight US Market :Dow closed -72 points

The Dow Jones industrial average erased its gain for the year on Thursday, part of a pullback for stock indexes as Treasury yields continued their upward march.

The Dow Jones industrial average fell 72 points, or 0.4%, to 19,732.40. That puts the Dow down about 32 points for the year and will makes this the fifth straight day of losses. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell 0.4% to 2,263.69. The Nasdaq composite fell 0.3% to 5,540.08.

Four stocks fell for every one that rose on the New York Stock Exchange.

Stocks have slowed in 2017 following an electrifying jump higher since Election Day. Investors are waiting to see what a Donald Trump presidency will really mean for stocks. They’ve already seen the optimistic case, as shown in the nearly 6% jump for the S&P 500 since Donald Trump’s surprise victory of the White House, propelled by expectations for lower taxes and less regulation on businesses.

But on the possible downside, increased tariffs or trade restrictions could mean drops in profits for big U.S. companies.

Bond yields continued their march higher, and the 10-year Treasury yield rose to 2.47% from 2.43% late Wednesday. Yields have generally been climbing since Election Day on expectations that President-elect Donald Trump’s policies will spur more inflation and economic growth. The 10-year yield is still below its perch above 2.60% that it reached in mid-December, but it’s well above the 2.09% yield it was at a year ago.

Reports have shown that the U.S. economy has been improving recently, and the latest on Thursday showed encouraging signs for the housing and labor markets. The fewest number of workers sought unemployment claims last week in 43 years, a sign that corporate layoffs are subsiding.

Overnight US MARKET :Dow closed -59 points.

Investor skittishness over coming policies under soon-to-be-president Donald Trump just days before his inauguration put stocks in the red Tuesday and pushed the Dow down for a third straight session.

Also haunting the market was another weak day for bank stocks, a sector that had performed strong at the start of the so-called “Trump rally” after Election Day but is running into profit taking. Shares of Morgan Stanley (MS) were down nearly 4% despite posting its best fourth-quarter since the financial crisis, while Goldman Sachs (GS) fell 3.3% and Citigroup (C) tumbled 2.1%.

The Dow Jones industrial average closed down 59 points, or 0.3%, to 19,827, or roughly 175 points shy of 20,000. At its low point, the Dow was down more than 110 points.

Markets were reacting to Trump comments in the Wall Street Journal suggesting that the U.S. dollar is “too strong” and could hurt U.S. multinationals. The president-elect also questioned an alternative tax reform plan being discussed by Republicans in the House of Representatives. A strong dollar hurts sales and earnings of U.S. companies that do a lot of business abroad.

Trump’s comments, not unlike some of his tweets that have caught investors by surprise on individual companies, created fresh uncertainty about what policies will actually be enacted once Trump takes office after Friday’s inauguration. Trump’s latest comments were viewed as new information by Wall Street.

The Standard & Poor’s 500 index closed down almost 7 points, or 0.3%, to 2267.89, while the Nasdaq composite fell 0.6% to 5538.73.

Bond prices rose. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.329%.

Overnight US Market :Dow closed +99 points. 46 pts short to cross 20k;Nasdaq at new high

Stocks ended higher Wednesday — and the super-hot Nasdaq notched another new high — in a volatile session that saw sharp swings after President-elect Donald Trump met with the press in a news conference for the first time in six months.

The Dow Jones industrial average climbed 99 points, or 0.5% to 19,954.28, while the S&P 500 ended up 0.3% to about a point and half shy of its record closing high of 2276.98.

It was the seventh winning session in a row for the Nasdaq composite, which gained 0.2%. It notched a new closing high of 5563.65, a dozen points above the previous record set the day before.

Health care stocks got hit after Trump criticized the industry moving production overseas as well as the bidding process for drugs. Energy stocks continued their strength as oil prices headed higher.

The health care sector was the biggest loser among the S&P 500 sectors. Trump said the government has to create new bidding procedures for the pharmaceutical drug industry “because they’re getting away with murder.” The remarks sent the S&P health care sector down 1.7%. Several pharmaceutical companies slumped, with Endo International (ENDP) falling 9%, the biggest decliner in the S&P 500. Perrigo (PRGO) lost 7% and Mallinckrodt (MNK) tumbled 7%.

Energy stocks were the biggest winners as oil prices jumped. Benchmark U.S. crude rose rose $1.43, or 2.8%, to $52.25 a barrel in electronic trading. Shares of Exxon Mobil rose 0.8%.

Bond prices rose after Trump’s news conference, sending the yield on the 10-year Treasury note down to 2.37% from 2.38% Tuesday.

Overnight US Market :Dow closed -43 points.

Stocks ended mixed Thursday as retailers dominated the news with Macy’s and Kohl’s both plunging following weak holiday-season reports that led the chains to cut their profit forecasts.

Still, the Nasdaq composite’s modest gain of 11 points, or 0.2%, was enough to notch a new all-time high. Settling at at 5487.94, it topped the old record by half a point.

The Dow Jones industrial average finished down 43 points, a 0.2% decline to 19,899.29. Losing 0.1% was the S&P 500, which settled at 2269 even.

nvestors were also focusing on upcoming U.S. jobs data following the publication of the minutes to the Federal Reserve’s last board meeting.

Private U.S. companies added 153,000 jobs in December, according to payroll processor ADP. That total was a bit lower than analysts expected and slightly slower than the pace of hiring for the rest of 2016. The government will issue its own hiring report on Friday.

Overnight US Market :Dow closed + 60 points.Now 58 points away to kiss 20k

Stocks climbed Wednesday as Wall Street posted a second straight day of gains in the new year and the Dow once again approached the 20,000 milestone.

The Dow Jones industrial average ended up 60 points, or 0.3%, to 19,942.16. The blue-chip index rose has come close to topping 20,000 several times in recent weeks but each time it gets near has pulled back. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index rose 0.6% and the Nasdaq composite index gained 0.9%. Both the S&P 500 and Nasdaq are near their record closing highs.

Stocks maintained their gains following the release of the minutes from the latest Federal Reserve meeting that provided clues to why policymakers raised interest rates in December for only the second time since 2006 and forecast three rate hikes in 2017 instead of the two moves previously anticipated.

Fed officials said they might have to raise interest rates faster than anticipated to prevent rapidly falling unemployment and President-elect Donald Trump’s proposed fiscal stimulus from fueling excessive inflation, according to minutes of the Fed’s December 13-14 meeting.

Benchmark U.S. crude was up 1.8% to $53.24 a barrel in New York. It lost $1.39 on Tuesday.

Overnight US Market :Dow closed +119 points

What a difference a year makes. The U.S. stock market kicked off the first day of trading of 2017 with solid gains, a year after plunging in the opening session of 2016 on its way to its worst week to start a year ever.

The benchmark Standard & Poor’s 500 stock index — which closed up 0.9% to 2258 — posted a gain on the first trading day of a new year for the first time since 2013. Last year, the large-company stock index cratered 1.53% on January’s first trading session — its sixth-worst Day 1 percentage loss and worst annual kickoff since 2001 —   on its way to a worst-ever first week of the year decline of 5.96%, according to S&P Dow Jones Indices. The S&P 500, however, rebounded and finished 2016 up 9.5%.

The Dow Jones industrial average rose as much 176 points before pulling back and finishing up 119 points, or 0.6%, to 19,882. The blue-chip index came within 105 points of 20,000 after a late-year flirtation with the milestone fell short. The technology-packed Nasdaq rose 0.9% and the small-company Russell 2000 stock index, which gained 19.5% in 2016, finished up 0.5%.

Overnight US Market :Dow closed -57 points.Now 237 points short of 20k

Stocks sank on the last trading day of 2016, with the Dow now 237 points short of the 20,000 milestone that it came closest to hitting on Dec. 20.

It was merely a weak end to a very strong year, however, with the S&P 500 gaining 9.5% and the small-company Russell 2000 jumping 19.5% for 2016.

For the day, the Dow Jones industrial average lost 0.3%, off 57 points to 19,762.60. But for 2016, the blue chips gained 13.4%.

The S&P 500 ended 0.5% lower for the day, while the Nasdaq composite fell 0.9%

Global stocks mostly rose on the year’s last day of trading, with Britain’s index rallying to hit another all-time high. The FTSE 100, which was trading for only a half day, rose 0.3%. That leaves the index 14.4% higher over 2016. Elsewhere in Europe, Germany’s DAX rose 0.3%, while France’s CAC 40 gained 0.5%.

Global Equities Encountering Resistance At Year-End

The Global Dow Index is running into its long-term Down trendline stemming from the 2007 all-time peak.

Here in the U.S., equity investors have been a bit spoiled as they’ve watched index after index break into all-time high ground this year. Around the globe, investors have not been so lucky. Yes, most international indices have rallied solidly this year. However, with few exceptions, the rallies have still left these international markets shy of their all-time highs. One illustration of this situation can be seen in a chart of the Global Dow Index (GDOW).

We’ve posted many times on the GDOW due to its reliable conformity to technical charting tools, despite the fact that very little money is traded off of it. Additionally, we have found it to be an accurate barometer of the state of the global equity market. Specifically, the GDOW is an equally-weighted index of 150 of the world’s largest stocks. While this includes U.S.-based companies, its heavy dose of international exposure has led to its aforementioned position below its all-time high.

Furthermore, it is currently running into potential resistance in the form of its post-2007 Down trendline connecting the 2007, 2014 and 2015 tops.

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Overnight US Market :Dow closed -23 points.

U.S. stocks ended lower Thursday as health care companies took more losses and investors’ Dow 20,000 watch goes on.

The Dow Jones industrial average finished 0.1% lower, down 23 points to 19,918.88, and 81 short of the never-reached 20,000 level. The S&P 500 and Nasdaq composite lost 0.2 % and 0.4%, respectively.

Alibaba (BABA) fell 2.8% after the U.S. government put the Chinese e-commerce company back on a list of marketplaces that sell large amounts of counterfeit goods and is slow to respond when companies complain about knockoffs. Chinese regulators have made similar criticisms.

Benchmark U.S. crude gained about 0.9% to $52.95 a barrel in New York. Energy companies made modest gains.

Bond prices fell. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note climbed to 2.56% from 2.54%.

The dollar dipped to 117.43 yen from 117.54 yen. The euro rose to $1.0455 from $1.0427.

Stocks in Europe were also quiet. The DAX in Germany lost 0.2% and France’s CAC-40 fell less than 0.2%. In Britain, the FTSE 100 got a 0.1% lift. Japan’s Nikkei 225 index edged 0.1% lower and the Hang Seng in Hong Kong lost 0.8%. The South Korean Kospi fell 0.1%.

44 Years Ago, The Dow Crossed 1,000 For The First Time – Here’s What Happened Next

With all eyes desperately urging The Dow to cross 20,000 and prove that everything in the world of Trumplandia is awesome, we thought some reflection on another major milestone in the omnipresent Stock Index would be worthwhile…

As The New York Times reported 44 years ago… The Dow Jones industrial average closed above the 1,000 mark yesterday for the first time in history.

 It finished at 1,003.16 for a gain of 6.09 points in what many Wall Streeters consider the equivalent of the initial breaking of the four-minute mile.

“This thing has an obvious psychological effect,” declared one brokerage-house partner. “It’s a hell of a news item. As for the perminence of it — well, I just don’t know.”

The Dow finally put it all together, the peace rally, the re-election of President Nixon, the surging economy, booming corporate profits and lessening fears about inflation and taxes and controls and other uncertainties of 1973.

With such kingpin issues leading the forward surge, the market fed on its own momentum. The Dow forged past 1,000 at 1:30 P.M. and it kept gaining almost consistently until the final bell.

At 3:29 P.M., red light bars flashed on above and below each of the time clocks surrounding the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange. This was the traditional visual signal to show that one minute of training time remained. At the same moment, a bell began clanging on the speaker’s rostrum – the auditory warning.

Traders, brokers and clerks on the floor – aware that history was in the making – broke into cheers that lasted about 20 seconds. Some paper was tossed in the air and drifted down like confetti.

Several hundred persons on the floor then turned to face newsreel cameras grinding away on the member’s gallery, some brokers waving like fans at a football game.

An office broker, watching the stock tape from his desk downtown, murmured in wonderment: “There’s a sort of renewed confidence in the whole economic outlook.”