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Tue, 28th February 2017

Anirudh Sethi Report

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Archives of “Dow Jones Indexes” Tag

Overnight US Market :Dow closed up 15.68 points. Closes at a record for 12th straight day, longest streak since 1987

Stocks rose Monday as the Dow closed at a record high for a twelfth straight day, something it hasn’t done since Jan. 1987 when it ran off 13 straight record closes to start the year, according to Bespoke Investment Group.

The Dow Jones industrial average rose 15.68 points, or 0.1%, to 20,837.44. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index added 2.39, or  0.1%, to 2369.73 and the Nasdaq composite index gained 16.59, or 0.3%, to 5861.90.

Energy stocks led the gainers as the price of crude rose.  Benchmark U.S. crude was up 20 cents, or 0.4%, at $54.15 a barrel in New York. The contract fell 46 cents on Friday.

Investors were looking ahead to President Donald Trump’s speech to Congress on Tuesday for details of promised tax cuts and infrastructure spending. U.S. stocks have benefited from Trump’s promise of pro-business changes, but investors are waiting to see  how large and rapid those changes will be.

During a meeting with governors Monday, Trump noted that his upcoming budget would include a big boost to defense spending. The White House separately said that the budget would include a $54 billion increase in defense spending while imposing corresponding cuts to domestic programs and foreign aid.

Investors were also looking ahead to Trump’s speech Tuesday to a joint session of Congress for details of how he plans to carry out promises to cut taxes and step up infrastructure spending.

n Europe, Germany’s DAX rose 0.2%, while France’s CAC-40 was flat. London’s FTSE-100 added 0.1% Major indexes in Asia posted losses. Tokyo’s Nikkei 225 index fell 0.9%. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng slid 0.2%. Seoul’s Kospi shed 0.4%.

Overnight US Market : Dow 11th straight record.

The Dow Jones industrial average capped off another profitable week by stretching its string of all-time closing highs to 11 sessions, its longest record-setting run since 1987.

A late-day rally propelled the Dow to its eleventh up day in a row and third straight week of gains, keeping alive the bullish vibe that has been in place since Feb. 9. Investors will quickly shift their focus to next week’s main event: President Trump’s key address to Congress Tuesday, a speech that Wall Street hopes will be laser-focused on his administration’s economic agenda.

The blue chip stock gauge, which has not finished down since Feb 8, has rallied nearly 770 points, or about 4%, in its hot streak. On Friday, after trading in negative territory for most of the day, it eked out a gain of 11.44 points to close at a record 20,821.76. The Dow’s 11-session winning streak matches a comparable run that ended back on Jan. 3, 1992, or 25 years ago.

More important, however, the Dow is chasing a string of 13 consecutive “record” closes dating back to Jan. 20, 1987

Wall Street is hoping that Trump will lay out in more detail his agenda of tax cuts for businesses and the middle class, as well as spending plans to upgrade the nation’s infrastructure. There is increasing concern among investors that Trump’s growth-friendly policies might not materialize fast enough to merit the sharp rise in stock prices.

Overnight US Market :Dow Closed + 97 points

Stocks closed out the week in a strong fashion Friday as the Dow, S&P 500 and Nasdaq all jumped to new all-time highs in the market’s push further into record territory.

The Dow Jones industrial average rose 96.97, or 0.5%, to close at a record 20,269.37, according to preliminary calculations. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index gained 8.23 points, or 0.4%, to 2316.10 and the Nasdaq composite index added 18.95, or 0.3%, 5734.13.  Both the S&P and Nasdaq were up for a fourth straight day.

Miners and other raw materials companies led the market rally and rising crude oil prices also gave energy companies a big boost. Investors kept their focus on strong company earnings and corporate deal news.

Investors have focused on companies quarterly results lately as they size up corporate America’s growth prospects. Earnings are on track to mark the second-consecutive quarter of growth after a losing streak of five straight quarters. Beyond earnings, investors are also eying Washington D.C. for signs the Trump administration will deliver on the promised business-friendly policy proposals that helped drive a market rally last fall, including slashing government regulations and taxes.

Benchmark U.S. crude was up 91 cents, or 1.7%, at $53.91 a barrel in New York. The contract rose 66 cents on Thursday. Brent crude, the benchmark for international oil prices, was up $1.05, or 1.9%, at $56.68 a barrel in London.

 

Overnight US Market :Dow closed +118 points ,Dow, S&P 500, Nasdaq blow past old records

Stocks were in rally mode Thursday as all three of the major indexes jumped to new all-time closing highs.

The Dow Jones industrial average jumped 118 points, or 0.6%, to 20,172.40.

Up by the same percentage were the S&P 500 and the Nasdaq composite — to their new highs of 2307.87 and 5715.18, respectively.

Investors weighed earnings from a batch of companies, including Twitter, Kellogg and Viacom. Energy stocks led the gainers as the price of crude oil headed higher. Utilities were down the most.

Benchmark U.S. crude gained 66 cents, or 1.3%, to $53.00 a barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange, while Brent crude, the benchmark for international oil prices, added 40 cents to $55.52 a barrel.

In earnings news:

Overnight US Market :Dow closed -19 points.

Energy companies led U.S. stock indexes lower Monday as the price of crude oil declined. Phone company and materials stocks were also among the big decliners. Investors were weighing the latest batch of company earnings news.

The Dow Jones industrial average fell 19.04 points, or 0.1%, to 20,052. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell 4.86 points, or 0.2%, to 2293, as the broad-based index snapped a three-day winning streak. The Nasdaq composite index fell 3.21, or 0.1%, to 5664, as the tech-heavy index pulled back from Friday’s record closing high.

Benchmark U.S. crude fell 82 cents, or 1.5%, to close at $53.01 a barrel in New York. Brent crude, used to price international oils, lost $1.09, or 1.9%, to $55.72 a barrel in London.

Several energy companies were trading lower. Devon Energy slid 3.2%, while Chesapeake Energy dropped 3%. Marathon Oil shed 4.1%.

The 10-year Treasury yield fell to 2.42% from 2.47% late Friday.

Investors are still cautious as Trump’s early acts as president have been shaping markets for the past couple of weeks. On Friday, Trump directed the Treasury Secretary to look for potential changes to the Dodd-Frank law, which reshaped financial regulations after the 2008-09 financial crisis. Investors applauded that move but remain uncertain about the future impact of other policies. Over the weekend, the U.S. immigration ban on refugees and travelers from seven Muslim-majority countries was blocked by a federal judge and an appeals court turned down a Justice Department request to set that judgment aside. The White House said it expects the courts to restore executive order, which was founded on a claim of national security.

Overnight US Market :Dow closes back above 20,000, Nasdaq hits record

Banks and other financial companies led stocks higher on Wall Street Friday as President Trump prepares to scale back financial industry regulations. Buyers were also encouraged by a pickup in hiring in January. Small-company stocks, which stand to benefit more than others from stronger economic growth, make sharp gains.

The Dow Jones industrial average jumped back above the 20,000 level as the blue-chip index rose 186.55 points, or 0.9%, to close at 20,071.46. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index gained 16.57, or 0.7%, to 2297.43, moving within one point of its record closing high of 2298.37. The Nasdaq composite index added 30.57, or 0.5%, to set a new record closing high of 5666.77.

The Russell 2000 index of smaller-company stocks climbed 1.5% to 1,377.84. Smaller, domestically-focused companies may have more to gain than their larger peers from faster growth in the U.S. The Russell made large gains at the end of 2016 based on those hopes.

The stock market rally kicked off early after the government reported that U.S. employers added 227,000 jobs in January, higher than last year’s average monthly gain of 187,000 and a sign that President Donald Trump has inherited a robust job market. The unemployment rate ticked up to a low 4.8% from 4.7% in December, but for a good reason: More people started looking for work. The percentage of adults working or looking for jobs increased to its highest level since September.

Financial firms rose after President Donald Trump took his first steps aimed at scaling back regulations on the industry. He signed an order that directs the Treasury Secretary to look for potential changes to the Dodd-Frank law, which reshaped financial regulations after the 2008-09 financial crisis and created the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

The order doesn’t have any immediate impact, but suggests Trump is intent on reducing regulations, which could boost profits for financial companies and banks.

Dow components Visa (V) and Goldman Sachs (GS) jumped 4.6%, JPMorgan Chase (JPM) added 3.1% and American Express (AXP) gained 2%. Smaller banks, which could find it easier to lend money if regulations are cut, also traded higher.

Barron’s: Next Stop Dow 30,000… On One Condition

The financial magazine which has made an art out of calling for big, round numbers in the Dow Jones Financial Index (as a reminder over 20% of the Dow’s surge since the election is due entirely to Goldman Sachs), most recently with its “get ready for Dow 20,000” call from just over a month ago, has done it again:

While there are still those – pretty much anyone who still cares about fundamentals – who are scratching their heads at Dow20K, according to Barrons “the Dow hitting 20,000 was no fluke. Today’s stock prices are well supported by solid prospects for corporate earnings and economic growth.” 

In fact, Dow 30,000 is just around the corner… well by 2025. All President Donald Trump has to do, according to Barron’s, is avoid stumbling into a trade war—or a real war.” Some of the profound insight behind this forecast so reminiscent of the infamous “Dow 36,000” prediction which hit just around the time of the last market bubble.

Clearly, part of the propulsion behind stocks has been the Trump administration and its flurry of business-friendly edicts. If Trump can succeed in reducing regulation and lowering corporate taxes, stocks should surge further this year. An additional 5% or even 10% gain in 2017 wouldn’t be surprising. Our projection of 30,000 by 2025 is based on our analysis of historical data provided by Jeremy Schwartz, director of research at WisdomTree. This data, which looks at stock market returns for rolling five-year periods dating back to 1871, suggest stock market gains will fall below the market’s typical annual gain of 6% after inflation in the next five years before accelerating above the average in the years after that.

Overnight US Market :Dow closed +32 points

Stock indexes wavered between small gains and losses before ending mixed Thursday as investors sized up the latest company earnings news. Consumer goods and industrial stocks climbed the most, while health care and utilities were among the biggest laggards.

The Dow Jones industrial average climbed further above the 20,000 level it passed Wednesday. gaining 32 points, or 0.2% to 20,100.91.

Wall Street came off solid gains from the day before. The Dow Jones industrial average, after topping the magic 20K milestone and staying there, hit a record closing high along with the Nasdaq composite and the S&P 500.

On Thursday the Nasdaq slipped fractionally, losing just 0.02% to 5655.18. Off a little less than 0.1% was the S&P 500, now at 2296.68.

It’s been a record-making week on Wall Street. The S&P 500 index and Nasdaq composite closed at all-time highs on Tuesday and Wednesday. The Dow, which tracks 30 major industrial companies, added its own milestone Wednesday after it breached the 20,000 mark for the first time.

The market is getting a general boost from strong company earnings and investor optimism that the Trump administration’s policies on taxes, regulation and trade will be good for business.

Oil  prices jumped as benchmark U.S. crude oil was up $1.07, or 2%, at $53.82 per barrel in New York. Brent crude, used to price international oils, was up $1.08, or 1.9%, at $56.50 a barrel in London.

Overnight US Market :Dow closed +95 points.

Stocks snapped their losing streak Friday as Donald Trump took the oath of office for president of the United States.

The Dow Jones industrial average closed up 95 points, or 0.5%, to 19,827 Friday, preventing what would have been the sixth straight down day in a row. The gains pushed the Dow back into the plus column for the year.

The Trump rally had been losing its gusto before the inauguration as investors worried that policy changes when the administration began might be less stimulative than hoped. All three major market measures, the Dow, the Standard & Poor’s 500index and the Nasdaq Composite, are down 0.3%, 0.2%, and 0.4%, for the week, respectively.

That’s why the strength Friday came as a relief. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index was up 0.3% to 2,271, just shy of its record closing high of 2,276.98 notched Jan. 6. The Nasdaq composite index was up 0.3% to 5,555 as it moved back closer to its record close of ,5,574.12.

Despite Friday’s gains, it was overall a negative week for stocks as investors fretted over what Trump might say in his inauguration speech regarding trade and government spending. Investors have been trying to price in the positives of lower tax rates and fiscal stimulation in the form of government infrastructure projects but also the negatives of trade restrictions and tariffs.

Such uncertainty is a reminder to investors that trying to time this kind of change is perilous.

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note was stable at 2.47%. The recent rise in Treasury yields has moderated lately. Treasury rates hit their highest point over the past 12 months on Dec. 27 at 2.56%. Treasury yields have been generally rising since July 2016 as investors expect inflation to increase. The yield on the 10-year has intensified as investors prepare for President Trump’s government spending plans, which are likely to increase the country’s level of debt.

Overnight US Market :Dow closed -72 points

The Dow Jones industrial average erased its gain for the year on Thursday, part of a pullback for stock indexes as Treasury yields continued their upward march.

The Dow Jones industrial average fell 72 points, or 0.4%, to 19,732.40. That puts the Dow down about 32 points for the year and will makes this the fifth straight day of losses. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell 0.4% to 2,263.69. The Nasdaq composite fell 0.3% to 5,540.08.

Four stocks fell for every one that rose on the New York Stock Exchange.

Stocks have slowed in 2017 following an electrifying jump higher since Election Day. Investors are waiting to see what a Donald Trump presidency will really mean for stocks. They’ve already seen the optimistic case, as shown in the nearly 6% jump for the S&P 500 since Donald Trump’s surprise victory of the White House, propelled by expectations for lower taxes and less regulation on businesses.

But on the possible downside, increased tariffs or trade restrictions could mean drops in profits for big U.S. companies.

Bond yields continued their march higher, and the 10-year Treasury yield rose to 2.47% from 2.43% late Wednesday. Yields have generally been climbing since Election Day on expectations that President-elect Donald Trump’s policies will spur more inflation and economic growth. The 10-year yield is still below its perch above 2.60% that it reached in mid-December, but it’s well above the 2.09% yield it was at a year ago.

Reports have shown that the U.S. economy has been improving recently, and the latest on Thursday showed encouraging signs for the housing and labor markets. The fewest number of workers sought unemployment claims last week in 43 years, a sign that corporate layoffs are subsiding.