Archives of “google” Tag

Google under fire for India market abuse

Investigators for India’s competition authorities have concluded that Google has abused its dominant position in online search advertising, adding to the lengthening list of global regulatory problems facing the US technology group.

The Competition Commission of India first began investigating Google in 2012, focusing in particular on AdWords, its online advertisement service.

As part of that process, the CCI’s investigative arm has completed a preliminary report, a copy of which has been seen by the Financial Times. It suggests a variety of breaches of competition law.

The Indian investigation comes as Google readies for a protracted legal dispute with the European Commission, which earlier this year accused the group of unfairly promoting its shopping services in search results.

It also follows other global antitrust investigations over recent years, including a landmark 2013 ruling in the US that cleared the company of giving unfair search prominence to its own products.

India’s government is investigating four complaints against Google, two of which are dealt with in the report. These were filed by Bharat Matrimony, an online matrimonial site, and Consumer Unity & Trust Society, a consumer protection group.

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The rags to riches tale of Google’s new CEO Sundar Pichai


He grew up in a humble two-room apartment on the southern tip of India, and when he won a Stanford scholarship his flight to San Francisco cost more than his father’s annual salary.

But the investment paid off, and after a quiet rise through Google, Sundar Pichai has now been appointed as chief executive of the search and advertising giant.

Colleagues say he is known as a diplomat with an incredible memory – a skill he first discovered when his family got their first rotary phone when he was 12.

He realised that after keying in a new telephone number once, it was locked in his brain.

But he was not a typical geek locked in a basement tapping out code.

Instead he captained his high school cricket team to victory in the regional finals.

His grades won him a place at Stanford where he couldn’t even afford a required $60 (£38) backpack, and he eventually dropped out of his PhD programme to focus on a business career.

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10 Elements of Successful Trading

Traders that have the right mind set, money management, and winning method make money, those that are missing even one of the three, will eventually ‘blow up’ their account. This applies to both professionals and amateurs.

Whether you are a swing trader just trading the market with the $SPY ETF, a growth investor up to your eyeballs in Google and Apple, or even a day trader, these principles still apply to you. I believe these are universal principles for all traders, many professionals have proven they are not bigger than these laws of trading, by destroying the capital in hedge funds and even entire banks.

Trading Methodology:

  1. Winning system-Only trade tested systems with a positive expectancy in the long term.
  2. Faith– Your system has to allow you to trade your beliefs about the market.
  3. Risk/Reward-Never trade unless your profit expectations are greater than your capital at risk.

Trader Psychology:

  1. Discipline-You have to keep trading your method even when it doesn’t work for a given time period.
  2. Ego-Admit when you are wrong.
  3. Emotions-Trade the math not your emotions.

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Google blurs out home of Germanwings crash pilot Andreas Lubitz

Google Maps has blurred out the home of Andreas Lubitz, the co-pilot who deliberately crashed a Germanwings flight into the French Alps.

Lubitz reportedly lived with his girlfriend in a flat in Dusseldorf, Germany, but anyone typing the address into Google Street View is shown a pixelated square instead of the property.

Following Lubitz’s decision to crash the Airbus 320 into the Alps last Tuesday, killing himself and 149 other people on board, some of his relatives have deleted their Facebook pages in order to maintain their privacy, according to reports.

Google did not immediately respond to calls for comment.

Andreas Lubitz

Germany has some of the strictest privacy laws in the world, with Lufthansa, Germanwings’ parent company, claiming it was powerless to know the details of Lubitz’s medical history amid reports he had suicidal tendancies.

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Nasdaq breaks 5000 for first time since 2000


The Nasdaq Composite broke past the 5,000 mark for the first time since 2000 as investors bid shares of Apple, Google and Facebook higher.

The tech-heavy index rose by as much as 0.7 per cent to 5,000.33 in morning trading in New York on Monday before pulling back to trade 0.66 per cent higher at 4.996.32.

The S&P 500 rose 0.4 per cent to 2,112.21 while the Dow Jones Industrial Average gained 0.6 per cent to 18,242.51.

Google Chairman Predicts the End of Internet

Speaking at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland on Thursday, Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt said that the internet will become so ubiquitous that it will “disappear,” CNET reports.

 When asked about his views on the future evolution of the web, the Google Chairman stated that he would “answer very simply that the internet will disappear.” Schmidt explained “there will be so many IP addresses…so many devices, sensors, things you are wearing, things that you are interacting with that you won’t even sense it; it will be part of your presence all the time.”

“Imagine you walk into a room, and the room is dynamic. And with your permission and all of that, you are interacting with the things going on in the room. A highly personalized, highly interactive and very, very interesting world emerges,” he noted.

Schmidt was speaking at a panel dubbed “The Future of the Digital Economy,” along with top executives from Vodafone, Facebook, and Microsoft.

Privacy Concerns

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European parliament votes for Google split idea

This won’t upset any Thanksgiving dinner plans, but Google should still take note.

The US-based web company has earned the ire of European parliamentarians, who have just voted 458 to 173 in Strasbourg in favour of a resolution that suggests its search engine could be separated from the rest of its services in order to remove a perceived bias in its results.

The vote lacks any of the heft of an antitrust investigation, but has ticked off US legislators, who say the move unnecessarily politicises the European Commission’s continuing inquiry into Google’s affairs.

The motion calling for the commission to consider unbundling Google’s services had been widely expected to pass on Thursday since it had the backing of the parliament’s two main political groups – the centre-right EPP and the centre-left Socialists.

It echoed ideas raised earlier this year by Sigmar Gabriel, the centre-left German vice-chancellor.

The commission’s five-year antitrust probe into Google’s search practices is currently under review after three aborted attempts to settle the case.

Although it is facing increasingly vocal demands from MEPs to take a tougher and more radical approach, competition officials have so far shown little enthusiasm to restructure Google.

Google launches “Camel Cam” for “Street View” in UAE

Google 10 years on, Stock up by 1000%.Market Cap $ 393.77 Billion.Total Employees 52000

It’s 10 years to the day since Google’s initial public offering and its shares are now nearly a 1000 per cent higher.GOOGLE OFFICE

That’s according to Google Finance (see chart) before the market open in New York today.

There are lots more stats around to mark the August 19 anniversary.

The Wall Street Journal notes how employees have grown from 2,000 to 52,000, cash in hand is up from a quarter of a billion dollars to $61bn, while Google has only had limited success in reducing its dependence on advertising – from around 99 per cent of revenues to 90 per cent.

From Google itself, there’s no Google Doodle on its home page to mark the occasion and no statement or list of achievements for the past ten years as a public company.

But you can still read what they set out to do in Larry and Sergey’s founders’ letterfor the IPO in 2004.

We’d most like to know how many searches people have carried out in the past 10 years – is it anywhere near a googol (the digit 1 followed by a 100 zeroes) yet?

Top Google executive Nikesh Arora jumps to Softbank

The world’s largest search engine has lost one of its top executives.

Google said that Nikesh Arora, who has spent a decade at the company and is currently its chief business officer, is leaving to join Japan’s Softbank.

Mr Arora will become vice chairman of Softbank and run its internet and media team.

The departure of Mr Arora came as Google reported second-quarter revenues that exceeded Wall Street’s forecasts.

Excluding sales handed onto partners, the search engine generated revenues of $12.67bn, topping forecasts of $12.3bn. Profits were $3.43bn in the quarter, up from $3.23bn a year ago.

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