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Wed, 22nd February 2017

Anirudh Sethi Report

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Archives of “new york stock exchange” Tag

Overnight US Market :Dow Closed + 97 points

Stocks closed out the week in a strong fashion Friday as the Dow, S&P 500 and Nasdaq all jumped to new all-time highs in the market’s push further into record territory.

The Dow Jones industrial average rose 96.97, or 0.5%, to close at a record 20,269.37, according to preliminary calculations. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index gained 8.23 points, or 0.4%, to 2316.10 and the Nasdaq composite index added 18.95, or 0.3%, 5734.13.  Both the S&P and Nasdaq were up for a fourth straight day.

Miners and other raw materials companies led the market rally and rising crude oil prices also gave energy companies a big boost. Investors kept their focus on strong company earnings and corporate deal news.

Investors have focused on companies quarterly results lately as they size up corporate America’s growth prospects. Earnings are on track to mark the second-consecutive quarter of growth after a losing streak of five straight quarters. Beyond earnings, investors are also eying Washington D.C. for signs the Trump administration will deliver on the promised business-friendly policy proposals that helped drive a market rally last fall, including slashing government regulations and taxes.

Benchmark U.S. crude was up 91 cents, or 1.7%, at $53.91 a barrel in New York. The contract rose 66 cents on Thursday. Brent crude, the benchmark for international oil prices, was up $1.05, or 1.9%, at $56.68 a barrel in London.

 

Overnight US Market :Dow closes back above 20,000, Nasdaq hits record

Banks and other financial companies led stocks higher on Wall Street Friday as President Trump prepares to scale back financial industry regulations. Buyers were also encouraged by a pickup in hiring in January. Small-company stocks, which stand to benefit more than others from stronger economic growth, make sharp gains.

The Dow Jones industrial average jumped back above the 20,000 level as the blue-chip index rose 186.55 points, or 0.9%, to close at 20,071.46. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index gained 16.57, or 0.7%, to 2297.43, moving within one point of its record closing high of 2298.37. The Nasdaq composite index added 30.57, or 0.5%, to set a new record closing high of 5666.77.

The Russell 2000 index of smaller-company stocks climbed 1.5% to 1,377.84. Smaller, domestically-focused companies may have more to gain than their larger peers from faster growth in the U.S. The Russell made large gains at the end of 2016 based on those hopes.

The stock market rally kicked off early after the government reported that U.S. employers added 227,000 jobs in January, higher than last year’s average monthly gain of 187,000 and a sign that President Donald Trump has inherited a robust job market. The unemployment rate ticked up to a low 4.8% from 4.7% in December, but for a good reason: More people started looking for work. The percentage of adults working or looking for jobs increased to its highest level since September.

Financial firms rose after President Donald Trump took his first steps aimed at scaling back regulations on the industry. He signed an order that directs the Treasury Secretary to look for potential changes to the Dodd-Frank law, which reshaped financial regulations after the 2008-09 financial crisis and created the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

The order doesn’t have any immediate impact, but suggests Trump is intent on reducing regulations, which could boost profits for financial companies and banks.

Dow components Visa (V) and Goldman Sachs (GS) jumped 4.6%, JPMorgan Chase (JPM) added 3.1% and American Express (AXP) gained 2%. Smaller banks, which could find it easier to lend money if regulations are cut, also traded higher.

14 things financial journalists won’t tell you.

IF YOU’RE READING the business section, you need to read between the lines. Here are 14 things financial journalists won’t tell you:

  1. That unbelievably telling anecdote at the top of my article? I scoured the country for three weeks to find that schmuck.
  2. The Dow industrials fell 263 points today. Why? By the time deadline arrives, I’ll have cooked up a reason.
  3. What qualifications do I possess? An ability to dial a telephone.
  4. Actually, I always wanted to be a sports reporter.
  5. Today, I had to bang out a long feature story on the mortgage market. My editor is looking to buy a new house.
  6. What qualifications do my sources possess? A willingness to pick up the receiver.
  7. If you saw my portfolio, you’d never ask me for financial advice.
  8. In the story, the company’s PR guy is quoted as saying, “no comment.” But on background, the senior counsel sung like a bird.
  9. The more the market falls, the giddier the newsroom gets.
  10. I don’t understand collateralized mortgage obligations, but I just wrote 1,000 words about them.
  11. My sources aren’t nearly as articulate as I make them sound.
  12. That joking, throwaway comment that the CFO made as we hung up? It’ll be in the second paragraph.
  13. We’ll get the online version up now, and figure out the real story for the print edition.
  14. I want my editors and sources to think I’m smart. What about readers? Yeah, I guess they’re also important.

Dow 20,000? It’s 30,000, Actually!

Start with the last point. Correct for mistakes dating from the days of paper and slide rule, and the Dow in fact passed 30000 for the first time last month, according to Birinyi Associates calculations.

The biggest mistake came from the simplistic recalculation of the average when it was expanded from 12 to 20 stocks. The official Dow record shows a drop of 24%—its worst-ever day—when the market reopened in 1914 after a four-month break because of the start of World War I. In fact, the market and the Dow rose that day, but the record was recalculated without any adjustment when the measure expanded from 12 to 20 stocks two years later. Because some of the new stocks added had lower prices, the new version of the average was pulled down. So, no, there really isn’t any reason to get worked up about the average passing 20000.

Its amusing silliness!

click for ginormous graphic

Source:
We’re Already at Dow 30000, You Just Don’t Know It
The blue-chip index is a poor measure of what investors are doing
James Mackintosh
Wall Street Journal, Jan. 25, 2017
www.wsj.com/articles/were-already-at-dow-30000-you-just-dont-know-it-1485362316

Overnight US Market :Dow closed +32 points

Stock indexes wavered between small gains and losses before ending mixed Thursday as investors sized up the latest company earnings news. Consumer goods and industrial stocks climbed the most, while health care and utilities were among the biggest laggards.

The Dow Jones industrial average climbed further above the 20,000 level it passed Wednesday. gaining 32 points, or 0.2% to 20,100.91.

Wall Street came off solid gains from the day before. The Dow Jones industrial average, after topping the magic 20K milestone and staying there, hit a record closing high along with the Nasdaq composite and the S&P 500.

On Thursday the Nasdaq slipped fractionally, losing just 0.02% to 5655.18. Off a little less than 0.1% was the S&P 500, now at 2296.68.

It’s been a record-making week on Wall Street. The S&P 500 index and Nasdaq composite closed at all-time highs on Tuesday and Wednesday. The Dow, which tracks 30 major industrial companies, added its own milestone Wednesday after it breached the 20,000 mark for the first time.

The market is getting a general boost from strong company earnings and investor optimism that the Trump administration’s policies on taxes, regulation and trade will be good for business.

Oil  prices jumped as benchmark U.S. crude oil was up $1.07, or 2%, at $53.82 per barrel in New York. Brent crude, used to price international oils, was up $1.08, or 1.9%, at $56.50 a barrel in London.

Overnight US Market :Dow closed -72 points

The Dow Jones industrial average erased its gain for the year on Thursday, part of a pullback for stock indexes as Treasury yields continued their upward march.

The Dow Jones industrial average fell 72 points, or 0.4%, to 19,732.40. That puts the Dow down about 32 points for the year and will makes this the fifth straight day of losses. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell 0.4% to 2,263.69. The Nasdaq composite fell 0.3% to 5,540.08.

Four stocks fell for every one that rose on the New York Stock Exchange.

Stocks have slowed in 2017 following an electrifying jump higher since Election Day. Investors are waiting to see what a Donald Trump presidency will really mean for stocks. They’ve already seen the optimistic case, as shown in the nearly 6% jump for the S&P 500 since Donald Trump’s surprise victory of the White House, propelled by expectations for lower taxes and less regulation on businesses.

But on the possible downside, increased tariffs or trade restrictions could mean drops in profits for big U.S. companies.

Bond yields continued their march higher, and the 10-year Treasury yield rose to 2.47% from 2.43% late Wednesday. Yields have generally been climbing since Election Day on expectations that President-elect Donald Trump’s policies will spur more inflation and economic growth. The 10-year yield is still below its perch above 2.60% that it reached in mid-December, but it’s well above the 2.09% yield it was at a year ago.

Reports have shown that the U.S. economy has been improving recently, and the latest on Thursday showed encouraging signs for the housing and labor markets. The fewest number of workers sought unemployment claims last week in 43 years, a sign that corporate layoffs are subsiding.

Overnight US Market :Dow closed -43 points.

Stocks ended mixed Thursday as retailers dominated the news with Macy’s and Kohl’s both plunging following weak holiday-season reports that led the chains to cut their profit forecasts.

Still, the Nasdaq composite’s modest gain of 11 points, or 0.2%, was enough to notch a new all-time high. Settling at at 5487.94, it topped the old record by half a point.

The Dow Jones industrial average finished down 43 points, a 0.2% decline to 19,899.29. Losing 0.1% was the S&P 500, which settled at 2269 even.

nvestors were also focusing on upcoming U.S. jobs data following the publication of the minutes to the Federal Reserve’s last board meeting.

Private U.S. companies added 153,000 jobs in December, according to payroll processor ADP. That total was a bit lower than analysts expected and slightly slower than the pace of hiring for the rest of 2016. The government will issue its own hiring report on Friday.

Overnight US Market :Dow closed -57 points.Now 237 points short of 20k

Stocks sank on the last trading day of 2016, with the Dow now 237 points short of the 20,000 milestone that it came closest to hitting on Dec. 20.

It was merely a weak end to a very strong year, however, with the S&P 500 gaining 9.5% and the small-company Russell 2000 jumping 19.5% for 2016.

For the day, the Dow Jones industrial average lost 0.3%, off 57 points to 19,762.60. But for 2016, the blue chips gained 13.4%.

The S&P 500 ended 0.5% lower for the day, while the Nasdaq composite fell 0.9%

Global stocks mostly rose on the year’s last day of trading, with Britain’s index rallying to hit another all-time high. The FTSE 100, which was trading for only a half day, rose 0.3%. That leaves the index 14.4% higher over 2016. Elsewhere in Europe, Germany’s DAX rose 0.3%, while France’s CAC 40 gained 0.5%.

Overnight US Market :Dow closed -23 points.

U.S. stocks ended lower Thursday as health care companies took more losses and investors’ Dow 20,000 watch goes on.

The Dow Jones industrial average finished 0.1% lower, down 23 points to 19,918.88, and 81 short of the never-reached 20,000 level. The S&P 500 and Nasdaq composite lost 0.2 % and 0.4%, respectively.

Alibaba (BABA) fell 2.8% after the U.S. government put the Chinese e-commerce company back on a list of marketplaces that sell large amounts of counterfeit goods and is slow to respond when companies complain about knockoffs. Chinese regulators have made similar criticisms.

Benchmark U.S. crude gained about 0.9% to $52.95 a barrel in New York. Energy companies made modest gains.

Bond prices fell. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note climbed to 2.56% from 2.54%.

The dollar dipped to 117.43 yen from 117.54 yen. The euro rose to $1.0455 from $1.0427.

Stocks in Europe were also quiet. The DAX in Germany lost 0.2% and France’s CAC-40 fell less than 0.2%. In Britain, the FTSE 100 got a 0.1% lift. Japan’s Nikkei 225 index edged 0.1% lower and the Hang Seng in Hong Kong lost 0.8%. The South Korean Kospi fell 0.1%.

44 Years Ago, The Dow Crossed 1,000 For The First Time – Here’s What Happened Next

With all eyes desperately urging The Dow to cross 20,000 and prove that everything in the world of Trumplandia is awesome, we thought some reflection on another major milestone in the omnipresent Stock Index would be worthwhile…

As The New York Times reported 44 years ago… The Dow Jones industrial average closed above the 1,000 mark yesterday for the first time in history.

 It finished at 1,003.16 for a gain of 6.09 points in what many Wall Streeters consider the equivalent of the initial breaking of the four-minute mile.

“This thing has an obvious psychological effect,” declared one brokerage-house partner. “It’s a hell of a news item. As for the perminence of it — well, I just don’t know.”

The Dow finally put it all together, the peace rally, the re-election of President Nixon, the surging economy, booming corporate profits and lessening fears about inflation and taxes and controls and other uncertainties of 1973.

With such kingpin issues leading the forward surge, the market fed on its own momentum. The Dow forged past 1,000 at 1:30 P.M. and it kept gaining almost consistently until the final bell.

At 3:29 P.M., red light bars flashed on above and below each of the time clocks surrounding the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange. This was the traditional visual signal to show that one minute of training time remained. At the same moment, a bell began clanging on the speaker’s rostrum – the auditory warning.

Traders, brokers and clerks on the floor – aware that history was in the making – broke into cheers that lasted about 20 seconds. Some paper was tossed in the air and drifted down like confetti.

Several hundred persons on the floor then turned to face newsreel cameras grinding away on the member’s gallery, some brokers waving like fans at a football game.

An office broker, watching the stock tape from his desk downtown, murmured in wonderment: “There’s a sort of renewed confidence in the whole economic outlook.”