Posts Tagged: saudis

 

You know something isn’t right in your country when you have a “religious police force.”  You know something is really, really not right in your country when the head of that religious police force starts condemning twitter and saying its users will go to hell as a consequence.  Talk about pathetic.  Just more strange andpanicked behavior from the Saudi government. From the BBC:

The head of Saudi Arabia’s religious police has warned citizens against using Twitter, which is rising in popularity among Saudis.

Sheikh Abdul Latif Abdul Aziz al-Sheikh said anyone using social media sites – and especially Twitter – “has lost this world and his afterlife”.

Twitter was the platform for those who did not have any platform, he said. >> Read More

Saudis offer extra oil to control prices

18 September 2012 - 23:55 pm
 

Saudi Arabia has offered its main customers in the US, Europe and Asia extra oil supplies through the end of the year, a sign the world’s largest exporter is worried about the impact of rising prices on the global economy.

The Group of Seven finance ministers last month called on oil exporters to expand production . Saudi Arabia initially reacted cooly to the request, saying that global supply and demand were balanced. But the kingdom has recently taken steps to bring down prices, consulting with large refiners and offering them extra oil.

“The current price is too high,” a senior Gulf-based oil official told the Financial Times. “We would like to see oil prices back to $100 a barrel.”

The price of Brent, the global oil benchmark, has risen 33 per cent from mid-June to a peak of $117.95 a barrel on Friday. On Monday it plunged almost $4 in just four minutes, but later recovered.

Saudi Arabia last launched a similar round of consultations with major oil refiners in March, weeks before it boosted its production to a 30-year high of 10m barrels a day. Riyadh is now evaluating the response from refiners. >> Read More

 

Coming into the weekend, most were focusing on key events coming out of Greece and France, possibly Egypt, but nobody expected that Saudi Arabia would be thrown into the fray. That just happened, however, following news that Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Nayef bin Abdulaziz al-Saud has died in Geneva, according to Saudi state television, citing a royal court statement. The news has sent Saudi shares sliding, because now 89-year-old King Abdullah must nominate a new heir for the second time in nine months. And the last thing the middle-east region needs, not to mention the world’s biggest oil producer, needs is more geopolitical uncertainty.

From Reuters: 

Nayef, interior minister since 1975 and thought to be 78, was the heir to Saudi King Abdullah and was appointed crown prince in October after the death of his elder brother and predecessor in the role, Crown Prince Sultan.

 

State television said the burial would be in Mecca on Sunday. 

Defence Minister Prince Salman, 76, seen as likely to continue King Abdullah’s cautious reforms, has long been viewed as the next most senior prince in the kingdom’s succession.

 Nayef had a reputation as a steely conservative who opposed King Abdullah’s reforms and developed a formidable security infrastructure that crushed al Qaeda but also locked up some political activists. 

He, King Abdullah and Salman are among the nearly 40 sons of Saudi Arabia’s founder, Abdulaziz ibn Saud, who established the kingdom in 1935. >> Read More

 

Between the Chinese ‘surprise’ RRR and the Iran export halt to UK and France (and escalating tensions), Oil prices are off to the races this evening. WTI front-month futures have just broken $105 (now up more than 10% in the last two weeks), the highest levels in over nine months and just 8% shy of the 5/2/11 post-recession peak just under $115. Brent (priced in EUR) remains off last week’s intraday highs (as EUR strengthens) but still above the pre-recession peak but in USD it traded just shy of $121 – well above last week’s peak. Of course, this will be heralded as a sign of demand pressure from a ‘growing’ global economy rather than the margin-compressing, implicit-taxation, consumer-spending-crushing supply constraint for Europe and the US that it will become in the not too distant future. As we post, The Guardian is noting that US officials are commenting that “Sanctions are all we’ve got to throw at the problem. If they fail then it’s hard to see how we don’t move to the ‘in extremis’ option.” The impact of any escalation from here is gravely concerning with PIMCO’s $140 minimum and SocGen’s $150-and-beyond Brent prices rapidly coming into focus – and for those pinning their hopes on the Saudis coming to the rescue (and fill the Iranian output gap), perhaps the news that our Middle-East ‘allies’ cut both production and exports in December will stymie any euphoria.

From The Guardian: US officials believe Iran sanctions will fail, making military action likely

• Growing view that strike, by Israel or US, will happen
• ‘Sweet spot’ for Israeli action identified as September-October
• White House remains determined to give sanctions time

It’s not that the Israelis believe the Iranians are on the brink of a bomb. It’s that the Israelis may fear that the Iranian programme is on the brink of becoming out of reach of an Israeli military strike, which means it creates a ‘now-or-never’ moment,” he said.

That’s what’s actually driving the timeline by the middle of this year. But there’s a countervailing factor that [Ehud] Barak has mentioned – that they’re not very close to making a decision and that they’re also trying to ramp up concerns of an Israeli strike to drive the international community towards putting more pressure on the Iranians.”

On 15th Feb ,We had written about WTI CRUDE : http://bit.ly/wWls2G

On 8th Feb ,We had written about BRENT CRUDE :http://bit.ly/xL0EAC

 

Between the Chinese ‘surprise’ RRR and the Iran export halt to UK and France (and escalating tensions), Oil prices are off to the races this evening. WTI front-month futures have just broken $105 (now up more than 10% in the last two weeks), the highest levels in over nine months and just 8% shy of the 5/2/11 post-recession peak just under $115. Brent (priced in EUR) remains off last week’s intraday highs (as EUR strengthens) but still above the pre-recession peak but in USD it traded just shy of $121 – well above last week’s peak. Of course, this will be heralded as a sign of demand pressure from a ‘growing’ global economy rather than the margin-compressing, implicit-taxation, consumer-spending-crushing supply constraint for Europe and the US that it will become in the not too distant future. As we post, The Guardian is noting that US officials are commenting that “Sanctions are all we’ve got to throw at the problem. If they fail then it’s hard to see how we don’t move to the ‘in extremis’ option.” The impact of any escalation from here is gravely concerning with PIMCO’s $140 minimum and SocGen’s $150-and-beyond Brent prices rapidly coming into focus – and for those pinning their hopes on the Saudis coming to the rescue (and fill the Iranian output gap), perhaps the news that our Middle-East ‘allies’ cut both production and exports in December will stymie any euphoria.

From The Guardian: US officials believe Iran sanctions will fail, making military action likely

• Growing view that strike, by Israel or US, will happen
• ‘Sweet spot’ for Israeli action identified as September-October
• White House remains determined to give sanctions time

It’s not that the Israelis believe the Iranians are on the brink of a bomb. It’s that the Israelis may fear that the Iranian programme is on the brink of becoming out of reach of an Israeli military strike, which means it creates a ‘now-or-never’ moment,” he said.

That’s what’s actually driving the timeline by the middle of this year. But there’s a countervailing factor that [Ehud] Barak has mentioned – that they’re not very close to making a decision and that they’re also trying to ramp up concerns of an Israeli strike to drive the international community towards putting more pressure on the Iranians.”

On 15th Feb ,We had written about WTI CRUDE : http://bit.ly/wWls2G

On 8th Feb ,We had written about BRENT CRUDE :http://bit.ly/xL0EAC

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