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Thu, 25th August 2016

Anirudh Sethi Report

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Archives of “Brain” Tag

No More Fingers! ‘Brainprints’ to Be the Passwords of the Future

BrainPeople can be accurately identified by their unique brain wave pattern, a new study has revealed.

A team at Binghamton University found that each of us has a personal “brainprint” that can be detected with particular techniques. In an experiment reported in the journal IEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security, the researchers, led by Dr Sarah Laszlo, explained how they selected 50 volunteers and showed them various images. 

These included photos of “a slice of pizza, a boat, Anne Hathaway, [and] the word ‘conundrum,’ ” the paper explains. As each subject looked at the images, an electroencephalogram (EEG) machine was picking up the way their brain behaved. 

The scientists found that each participant’s brain reacted in a different and specific way to the images shown. Building on that, the researchers managed to developed an algorithm which was able to match every person with their “brainprint” with high accuracy.

According to Laszlo and her colleagues, “brainprints” could become the passwords of the future. One could first be plugged to the EEG machine to record his or her particular “brainprint” as they look at some specific image, effectively setting a “brain pin code.” Then, every time that person sees that given image again, another EEG machine would cross-reference its brainwaves with a vast database to confirm their identity beyond any doubt.

MRI’s of Succesful Traders

I’ve seen this study making the rounds on several websites now as a type of neuroeconomic confirmation of Buffetological principles…

Perhaps procedure might be slightly useful as a means of seeing physical brain improvement by training– such as that found through meditative practices.

“Traders who buy more aggressively based on NAcc signals earn less. High-earning traders have early warning signals in the anterior insular cortex before prices reach a peak, and sell coincidently with that signal, precipitating the crash. These experiments could help understand other cases in which human groups badly miscompute the value of actions or events.”

“Neuroeconomists Confirm Warren Buffet’s Wisdom”:

“Seeing what’s going on in people’s brains when they are trading suggests that Buffett was right on target,” says Colin Camerer, the Robert Kirby Professor of Behavioral Economics at Caltech.

That is because in their experimental markets, Camerer and his colleagues found two distinct types of activity in the brains of participants—one that made a small fraction of participants nervous and prompted them to sell their experimental shares even as prices were on the rise, and another that was much more common and made traders behave in a greedy way, buying aggressively during the bubble and even after the peak. The lucky few who received the early warning signal got out of the market early, ultimately causing the bubble to burst, and earned the most money. The others displayed what former Federal Reserve chairman Alan Greenspan called “irrational exuberance” and lost their proverbial shirts.

How Does the Brain Work?-Video

Dr. Neal DeGrasse Tyson & NOVA science NOW delve into magic and the brain, artificial intelligence, magnetic mind control, and the work of neuroscientist and synesthesia researcher David Eagleman. Can we really believe our own eyes? Will machines one day think like us? Can magnetic wands effectively control brain functions and treat depression?

MRI’s of Succesful Traders

I’ve seen this study making the rounds on several websites now as a type of neuroeconomic confirmation of Buffetological principles…

Perhaps procedure might be slightly useful as a means of seeing physical brain improvement by training– such as that found through meditative practices.

“Traders who buy more aggressively based on NAcc signals earn less. High-earning traders have early warning signals in the anterior insular cortex before prices reach a peak, and sell coincidently with that signal, precipitating the crash. These experiments could help understand other cases in which human groups badly miscompute the value of actions or events.”

“Neuroeconomists Confirm Warren Buffet’s Wisdom”:

Work on brain’s ‘GPS’ system wins Nobel prize

The 2014 Nobel Medicine Prize has won by John O’Keefe of University College London and May-Britt Moser and Edvard Mosel, a married couple working at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, “for their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain”.

As the Nobel Assembly in Stockholm put it, the laureates found an “inner GPS” that enables humans and other animals to orient themselves in space

Prof O’Keefe discovered the first component of the brain’s positioning system in 1971, working with rats. He found a type of neuron in the hippocampus that was always active when an animal was at a certain place in its cage.

Other neurons were activated when the rat was in different places. He concluded that these “place cells” formed a map of its surroundings.

More than three decades later in 2005 May-Britt and Edvard Moser – who had earlier worked as visiting scientists in Prof O’Keefe’s UCL lab – discovered another key component of the brain’s positioning system.

What’s Your Trading Brain Type?

BRAIN123Five Types

To summarize, there are five general brain types. Among traders and investors, the three most important brain types are Compulsive, Impulsive and Anxious.

People with Compulsive Brains tend to get stuck in a particular thought about the market. “It’s too high.” “It’s too manipulated.” “It’s too risky.” It’s too…” whatever. People with Compulsive Brains tend to operate entirely on their own terms and are generally not open to feedback or other options.  

People with Impulsive Brains are the exact opposite. They are unpredictable and lack impulse control in trading/investing and in daily life. Without much discipline, they start many more projects than they finish. They live for creativity and for what’s possible.

People with Anxious Brains live with a rain cloud overhead.  They pay more attention to the obstacles to their own success (or the success of others) than to the ways that something might work. They don’t like to try new things and don’t appreciate novelty.

MRI’s of Succesful Traders

I’ve seen this study making the rounds on several websites now as a type of neuroeconomic confirmation of Buffetological principles…

Perhaps procedure might be slightly useful as a means of seeing physical brain improvement by training– such as that found through meditative practices.

“Traders who buy more aggressively based on NAcc signals earn less. High-earning traders have early warning signals in the anterior insular cortex before prices reach a peak, and sell coincidently with that signal, precipitating the crash. These experiments could help understand other cases in which human groups badly miscompute the value of actions or events.”

“Neuroeconomists Confirm Warren Buffet’s Wisdom”:

“Seeing what’s going on in people’s brains when they are trading suggests that Buffett was right on target,” says Colin Camerer, the Robert Kirby Professor of Behavioral Economics at Caltech.

That is because in their experimental markets, Camerer and his colleagues found two distinct types of activity in the brains of participants—one that made a small fraction of participants nervous and prompted them to sell their experimental shares even as prices were on the rise, and another that was much more common and made traders behave in a greedy way, buying aggressively during the bubble and even after the peak. The lucky few who received the early warning signal got out of the market early, ultimately causing the bubble to burst, and earned the most money. The others displayed what former Federal Reserve chairman Alan Greenspan called “irrational exuberance” and lost their proverbial shirts.

5 Types of Brain

Five Types

To summarize, there are five general brain types. Among traders and investors, the three most important brain types are Compulsive, Impulsive and Anxious.

People with Compulsive Brains tend to get stuck in a particular thought about the market. “It’s too high.” “It’s too manipulated.” “It’s too risky.” It’s too…” whatever. People with Compulsive Brains tend to operate entirely on their own terms and are generally not open to feedback or other options.  

People with Impulsive Brains are the exact opposite. They are unpredictable and lack impulse control in trading/investing and in daily life. Without much discipline, they start many more projects than they finish. They live for creativity and for what’s possible.

People with Anxious Brains live with a rain cloud overhead.  They pay more attention to the obstacles to their own success (or the success of others) than to the ways that something might work. They don’t like to try new things and don’t appreciate novelty.

4 Steps to Changing Your Bad Trading Habits

1. Understand the benefit of change. First, ask yourself if you need to change. Then, ask yourself what you need to change. Identify your current habits and ponder the benefits of changing them. Perhaps while trading you are feeling negative emotions such as stress, anxiety, temptation, or frustration. And ultimately, these emotions cause you to make poor, impulsive and self-destructive decisions. Write down what would happen if you were no longer feeling such negative emotions. That is, what would happen if you were able to remain calm and clear-headed while trading?

2. Dissect the proposed change and benefits. Find as many holes in the prospective change as you can. Don’t just convince yourself that things will become better if you change. Make sure the grass actually is greener on the other side of the fence. Be clear about what you want to change and how you will go about it. Write down the benefits that will take place if you do indeed change.

3. Recognize the situation that triggers your self-destructive action. Write down those all-too-familiar conditions, or circumstances, that lend themselves to activating negativity within you (e.g., all the things done, or said, that push your buttons). Also, write down how you are going to consciously recognize them during the day as they happen. Now, next to each item, write down what systems and processes you will implement to avoid letting that situation become emotional. Read More