Posts Tagged: stock

 

Closing changes for the major European bourses:

  • UK FTSE -0.2%
  • German DAX -0.5%
  • French CAC -0.3%
  • Spain IBEX – flat
  • Italy MIB -0.3%

Despite the declines it was a good week for European stocks as the market gets excited about QE:

  • UK FTSE +1.3%
  • German DAX +1.4%
  • French CAC +1.9%
  • Spain IBEX – +1.6
  • Italy MIB +1.2%

CME Hikes Silver, Brent, RBOB Margins

06 February 2015 - 6:27 am
 

In case algos still haven’t gotten the message to jump all aboard into the S&P, here comes the CME with a gntle nudge in the form of 90 pages of margin hikes including Brent, RBOB and, just in case there is still anyone who wishes to trade paper precious metals against the BIS, silver. In fact, at first glance it appears the only future  whose margin was not hiked was stocks: apparently stocks are never volatile enough for a margin hike.

 

European stocks have been generally lower every day this year but they staged a modest rebound on Wednesday.

  • UK FTSE +0.7%
  • French CAC +0.6%
  • German DAX +0.3%
  • Italy MIB +0.1%
  • Spain IBEX +0.4%

14 Meaningless Stock Market Phrases

05 January 2015 - 15:37 pm
 

14 Meaningless Phrases That Will Make You Sound Like A Stock-Market Wizard

“The easy money has been made.”
“I’m cautiously optimistic.”
“It’s a stockpicker’s market.”
“It’s not a stock market. It’s a market of stocks.”
“We’re constructive on the market.”
“Stocks are down on ‘profit taking.’”
“The trend is your friend.”
“More buyers than sellers.”
“There’s lots of cash on the sidelines.”
“We’re in a bottoming process.”
“Overbought.”
“Buy on weakness.”
“Take a wait-and-see approach.”
“It’s a show-me stock.”

 
  1. The easy money has been made

When to use it: Any time a market or stock has already gone up a lot.BLUE CHANNELS IN INDIA

Why it’s smart-sounding: It implies wise, prudent caution. It implies that you bought or recommended the stock a long time ago, before the easy money was made (and are therefore smart). It suggests that there might be further upside but that there might also be future downside, because the stock is “due for a correction” (another smart-sounding meaningless phrase that you can use all the time). It does not commit you to any specific recommendation or prediction. It protects you from all possible outcomes: If the stock drops, you can say “as I said…” If the stock goes up, you can say “as I said…”

Why it’s meaningless: It’s a statement of the obvious. It’s a description of what has happened, not what will happen. It requires no special insights or powers of analysis. It tells you nothing that you don’t already know. Also, it’s not true: The money that has been made was likely in no way “easy.” Buying stocks that are rising steadily is a lot “easier” than buying stocks that the market has left for dead (because everyone thinks you’re stupid to buy stocks that no one else wants to buy.)

2.I’m cautiously optimistic. >> Read More

 
  • Give up your need to be right: The market is always right, do not strive to be right in your predictions and opinions. Strive to go with the flow of the market.
  • Give up control: No matter how long you watch a live stock stream, you have no power over the movements. Save your emotional energy by not trying to cheer on your positions and get wrapped up in every price tick.
  • Give up blaming other factors for your losses: There is no mysterious ‘They’ causing you to lose money. Your choices cause you to lose money, or your system just had a losing trade. It is a free country and free market.
  • Give up beating yourself up for losing trades: If you followed your trading plan, then there should be zero regrets involved in a losing trade. If you did not follow your plan and lost, then money was the tuition and you paid  to learn the lesson. You must move on to the next trade. 
  • Give up your own opinions: If you took a trade based on your own opinion, you have to give up your opinion and get out if the trade moves to a place that proves you were wrong.
  • Give up your inability to change your mind: The more you believe a trade just can’t miss, the more dangerous it is. It will cause you to trade too big and stay in too long. You have to always be ready to be wrong.
  • Give up your past trades: Each trade is a new trade. Do not hold grudges against stocks and think they ‘owe’ you for past losses. Do not fall in love with a stock and hold it as it falls lower and lower.
  • Give up letting your trading define your self worth: Do not let your trading define you. Diversify your life with friends, family, hobbies, and other interests. It is not healthy to become overly obsessed with the markets.
  • Give up on losing trades quickly when your stop is hit: Your best trades will be the ones that are profitable from the start. If they immediately go against you, be prepared to be stopped out. You can destroy your trading account when you start the “It will come back, I just have to wait” chant in the midst of a death spiral.
  • Give up on price targets let your winners run as far as they will go: In the right market conditions trends can go on to unbelievable levels. The big wins during these trends can make your entire career. If you set a predefined profit target, you will not miss the opportunity when it comes. Let a trailing stop take you out.

Zen of Trading- 10 Rules

03 December 2014 - 15:35 pm
 

1. Have a Comprehensive Plan: Whether you are an investor or active trader, you must have a plan. Too many investors have no strategy at all — they merely react to each twitch of the market on the fly. If you fail to plan, goes the saying, then you plan to fail.
Consider how Roger Clemens approaches a game. He studies his opponent, constructs his game plan and goes to work.

Investors should write up a business plan, as if they were asking a Venture Capitalist for start-up money; just because you are the angel investor doesn’t mean you should skip the planning stages.

2. Expect to Be Wrong: We’ve discussed this previously, but it is such a key aspect of successful investing that it bears repeating. You will be wrong, you will be wrong often and, occasionally, you will be spectacularly wrong.
Michael Jordan has a fabulous perspective on the subject: “I’ve missed more than 9,000 shots in my career. I’ve lost almost 300 games. Twenty six times, I’ve been trusted to take the game-winning shot and missed. I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed.”

Jordan was the greatest ball player of all time, and not only because of his superb physical skills: He understood the nature and importance of failure, and placed it appropriately within a larger framework of the game. >> Read More

 

With Apple at record highs, its market capitalization is now bigger than Russia’s entire stock market (the 20th largest market in the world). What’s more : there would be enough money left over after selling Apple and buying Russia to purchase over 190 million contract-free 64Gb iPhone6 Pluses (enough for every Russian). 

 

Russia, the 20th largest among the world’s major markets, is not the only one Apple has surpassed. The company, which forecasts a record holiday-sales quarter and has $155 billion in cash, is also bigger than 17th-ranked Singapore and 18th-ranked Italy.

 

“It has often been pointed out that any of several different plans of operation, if followed consistently over a number of years, would have produced consistently a net gain on market operations. The fact is, however, that many traders, having not set up a basic strategy and having no sound philosophy of what the market is doing and why, are at the mercy of every panic, boom, rumor, tip, in fact, of every wind that blows. And since the market, by its very nature, is a meeting place of conflicting and competing forces, they are constantly torn by worry, uncertainty, and doubt. As a result, they often drop their good holdings for a loss on a sudden dip or shakeout; they can be scared out of their short commitments by a wave of optimistic news; they spend their days picking up gossip, passing on rumors, trying to confirm their beliefs or alleviate their fears; and they spend their nights weighing and balancing, checking and questioning, in a welter of bright hopes and dark fears.

Furthermore, a trader of this type is in continual danger of getting caught in a situation that may be truly ruinous. Since he has no fixed guides or danger points to tell him when a commitment has gone bad and it is time to get out with a small loss, he is prone to let stocks run entirely past the red light, hoping that the adverse move will soon be over, and there will be a ‘chance to get out even,’ a chance that often never comes. And, even should stocks be moving in the right direction and showing him a profit, he is not in a much happier position, since he has no guide as to the point at which to take profits. The result is he is likely to get out too soon and lose most of his possible gain, or overstay the market and lose part of the expected profits. >> Read More

Don’t Marry Hot stocks, Just Date Them

13 September 2014 - 10:08 am
 

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  1. Hot stocks are only good when they are in up trends, when the party is over you have to break up with them.
  2. Hot stocks are great to trade in and out of but you don’t want to turn them into a life long investment.
  3. A good stock might look great on the outside with it’s price action but it may not have the best fundamentals for getting serious with.
  4. Hot stocks are great for the short term but for the long term you want a solid investment.
  5. Be careful with hot stocks they may look great on the outside but they can break your heart at any moment.
  6. A hot stock can be a lot of fun for awhile but they can be a lot of drama when no one wants them anymore.
  7. As long as a hot girlfriend is very popular  she will be happy but when no one wants to date her she goes into a downward spiral. This applies to hot stocks as well. 

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Technically Yours,
Team ASR,
Baroda, India.